Santa Fe’s Best New Restaurants
comment Comment Written by in Sante Fe
All photos by Juliet White

All photos by Juliet White

Considering the recent culinary additions to the Santa Fe restaurant scene, these are the establishments that stand out.

Eloisa

228 E. Palace Avenue, Santa Fe

IMG_Eloisa1

Judging by Eloisa, hotel restaurants in Santa Fe have graduated to the major leagues. The rustic, modern space and open kitchen has the type of slick atmosphere you might expect to find in Los Angeles’s hipster neighborhoods, rather than inside a Drury Hotel. The heavily New Mexican offerings consist of both large and small plates, but opt for the small plates to acquire a better overview of the menu. Start with the ensalada sandia, which features shrimp perched atop watermelon, drizzled with mojito vinaigrette — a perfect combination of refreshing flavors and playful plating. Although tacos are available in virtually every Santa Fe restaurant, you’re unlikely to find blue corn tortillas stuffed with pastrami and sauerkraut elsewhere. And, as for the croque jamon, it’s essentially a reimagined croque monsieur using serrano ham and with manchego cheese in place of the more traditional gruyère. Accompany your meal with the Eloisa cocktail, which marries cava with slowly macerated apricot liqueur.
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10 Restaurants Where You’ll Want to Try Every Part of the Animal
Photo by Travis/Flickr

Photo by Travis/Flickr

Filet mignon and roast chicken have their place, but for more adventurous diners, it’s all about the offal.
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Food Styling: 6 tricks and secrets that make us hungry enough to buy anything
Michael Stern/Flickr

Michael Stern/Flickr

It’s happened to us all – we see a commercial, or scroll past a picture on social media, featuring a dish that makes our stomachs growl. Whether it’s a juicy burger topped with luscious melted cheese or a slice of rich chocolate cake so moist it almost glistens, chances are a lot of work went into making that food look as good as it does.
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What’s Up With All-White Meat Chicken? America’s Breast Obsession
JaBB/Flickr

JaBB/Flickr

Boneless, skinless chicken breast is pretty much as ubiquitous as a food gets in the USA. But why did this one cut become so wildly popular…and what the heck happens to all of the dark meat that none of us seem to be eating?
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No Chinatown? No Problem! Part VIII – Pittsburgh

In this multi-part survey of Chinese food in different cities across the United States, a number of distinct models arise. Cities like Los Angeles, San Francisco, and New York have a 19th century core Chinatown that still exists today, but where the best Chinese food has migrated to the suburbs. In cities like San Diego, Phoenix, and St. Louis, the historic core Chinatown became extinct, but the Chinese community was later revived in the suburbs, as the repeal of Chinese exclusion laws brought in a new wave of Chinese immigrants. Cities like Las Vegas, Dallas, and Atlanta never had a historic core Chinatown, but developed Chinese communities in the 20th century post-immigration reform years. In Houston, a small downtown Chinatown developed during the period of immigration exclusion, followed by a larger suburban Chinese community later in the 20th century. And in Chicago, the historic core Chinatown still dominates. Read the rest of this entry »


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