Menuism Dining Blog
Dining education for foodies

Photo by Evan Wood / Flickr

Photo by Evan Wood / Flickr

Urban winemaking. It almost sounds like an oxymoron.

But it’s one of the best new trends in wine. Especially since it allows winemakers to work in collective or shared facilities or even in their own garages – lowering the costs and barriers to entry, and giving them the freedom to experiment with varietals sourced all over the place. And that leads to a newness and freshness that these emerging winemakers thrive on.

There are more than a dozen urban wineries in the Portland area – but there are also urban wineries in Eugene, Roseburg, and even as far South as Medford – and they’re making some fantastic wine. We’ve devoted several of our monthly selections to urban winemakers and collectives, and I always love highlighting these winemakers and letting people know how easy it can be to taste wine right in the middle of your city! (more…)

Posted by on September 26th, 2016

Photo by Kevin O'Mara / Flickr

Photo by Kevin O’Mara / Flickr

There’s nothing like treating yourself to a nice drink when you’re out on the town, whether you’re at a new restaurant or revisiting an old favorite. But too often we’re stuck choosing between beer and wine, never considering that a cocktail can also be paired with food, and not just enjoyed as a before- or after-dinner indulgence.

Luckily, using the same knowledge you have of wine and beer pairings, it’s easy to find a cocktail that can match your meal. With a little caution and a bit of risk, you may find a new favorite way to enjoy a drink with dinner. (more…)

Posted by on September 12th, 2016

Photo by erik forsberg / Flickr

Photo by erik forsberg / Flickr

There’s a reason why everyone loves sandwiches. They’re easy to eat on the go, and pack a wallop of flavors and textures in each bite. But some sandwiches are better than others, and these 10 are famous for a reason. (more…)

Posted by on September 6th, 2016

Photo by McDonald's

Photo by McDonald’s

In recent weeks, the fast-food industry has made a renewed push to remove antibiotics from its chicken products. Among them:

McDonald’s declared it would have no more antibiotics in its Chicken McNuggets and other chicken products.

Papa John’s completed its transition to antibiotic-free grilled chicken pizza toppings and Poppers.

Papa Murphy’s announced that it became the first national pizza brand to serve chicken raised without antibiotics.

And Dickey’s Barbecue Pit made a formal commitment to serving only antibiotic-free chicken.

Why the change? Antibiotics are used for animal health maintenance, disease prevention, and treatment of disease, but there’s a growing concern among consumers and health officials that these same antibiotics lead to an increase in treatment-resistant bacterial infections in humans. Thus, the food industry, including fast food, has been continuously moving away from the practice.

Additionally, there’s been a measured shift toward chicken and away from beef in fast food. According to a recent report by research firm Technomic, the top 250 U.S. restaurant chains added about 325 new chicken items during the 12-month period ended June 30, compared to just 73 new beef items. Analysts say this trend reflects consumer cravings for healthier, high-protein meat.

Posted by on August 29th, 2016

Photo by KDCChicago / Flickr

Photo by KDCChicago / Flickr

My series has traced the general pattern of historic center city core Chinatowns in the United States. In most of these cities, much of the population, and correspondingly the authentic Chinese food, has fled to the suburbs, such as the San Gabriel Valley outside of Los Angeles, or Flushing and Brooklyn in New York. The only real exception to this rule that I’ve discussed so far is Philadelphia, whose Chinatown has gone through an unexpected revival in the past five years, though it has not expanded geographically.

Happily, another exception to this pattern is Chicago Chinatown, which not only is thriving, but also experiencing significant population growth and geographic expansion. Chicago Chinatown’s population increased by 25 percent between 2000 and 2010 and its boundaries are spilling into adjacent neighborhoods. But why is Chicago the great exception as a Chinese culinary center with a growing Chinatown? Especially when contrasted to Los Angeles Chinatown, which has become a hotbed of non-Chinese restaurants, or Manhattan Chinatown, which is gentrifying and losing turf particularly on the Lower East Side, or San Francisco Chinatown, abuzz in rumors of technology industry incursion, or Washington, DC Chinatown, which may be on its last legs? (more…)

Posted by on August 23rd, 2016

Rachael White

Rachael White
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