So you have an adventurous spirit when it comes to food and you especially have an interest in trying out cuisines from other countries; however, there are those times when you walk into a restaurant, sit down and read menu that literally is in a foreign language. Yikes, what do you do?

Well, the first thing that usually helps is to do a little bit of research beforehand so that you don’t go in blind. Today, you’re getting a jump start on British Food because below, you’ll be getting a list of some common dishes and ingredients you may find on an English restaurant menu. So are you ready to increase your foodie vocabulary? (more…)

Posted by on June 20th, 2010

Along with hot dogs and hamburgers, pizza is quintessential American food, even if it came by the way of Greece and than Italy, but did you know that the variety of pizzas go beyond just thin crust and thick crust or New York and Chicago? While we’ll also mention New York and Chicago pizza below, there’s definitely others that you might now mind sinking your teeth into. (more…)

Posted by on June 8th, 2010

Photo Credit to Hexodus

Corn smut is a disease of maize caused by the pathogenic plant fungus Ustilago maydis. Known in Latin America as huitlacoche, it is eaten, usually as a filling in quesadillas and other tortilla-based foods.    Whether referred to as “corn smut” or “huitalacoche”, this food may not necessarily inspire one’s appetite. However, just like mushrooms which is also a fungus, this corn smut has an earthy and sometimes smoky flavor profile that may be more appealing than you think.  Huitalacoche is still an unknown food to many, so let’s learn a little more about it. (more…)

Posted by on June 1st, 2010

Sometimes there’s just nothing like having a doughnut and a cup of coffee in the morning.  Between the sugar and the caffeine, it can certainly jump start your day.  There’s definitely a lot more behind this tasty cake than you may think, so I present to you 10 Things to Know About Doughnuts.

The Dutch Did It: Although not verified, some credit has gone to the Dutch for importing doughnuts to America, around 1847. The donut or doughnut is a deep-fried piece of dough or batter. It comes from the Dutch origin of olykoeck or “oily cake”. The two most common types of donuts are the filled donut and the ring donut.

As Old As Time: Archaeologists have found petrified fried cakes with holes in them in the southwestern U.S. in prehistoric Native American ruins. So doughnuts have been invented more than once. (more…)

Posted by on May 27th, 2010

If you’re hungry, this may not be the best time to look at food photos, but then how can you resist?

Pizza with Truffle Oil and Sunny Side Up Egg from Meritage American Bistro in Old Tappan, NJ (more…)

Posted by on May 19th, 2010

Culinary ByteSometimes in my reading foodie stuff, whether through a book or online or a magazine, I come across some quirky food words that make you scratch your head as to what the heck they are, until the definition helps shed some light.  See what I mean below.

cochinita pibil: A traditional Mexican slow-roasted pork dish from Yucatán Península. Preparation of traditional cochinita or puerco pibil involves marinating the meat in strongly acidic citrus juice, coloring it with annatto seed, and roasting the meat while it is wrapped in banana leaf.

estouffade: 1. a French term referring to a dish whose ingredients are slow cooked. 2. a clear brown stock used to dilute sauces, ragouts and braised dishes.

gastronome: a person with a refined palate or connoisseur of good food. While appreciating the most refined products of the culinary arts, the true gastronome enjoys them in moderation.

gallimaufry: once considered to be a reputable dish of thinly sliced meats, minced onion, wine, and verjuice, seasoned with ginger. Since the seventeenth century the term has come to refer to an unappetizing, badly prepared dish. (more…)

Posted by on April 4th, 2010

Do you want to know what’s happening in the food world? Check out the links below for some of this week’s latest.

Chef Stories

Restaurant Stories

Food Stories

Wine and Spirits Stories

Posted by on April 2nd, 2010

Spring is here and with a chance to win $100 and all you have to do is write a review about a wonderful or not so wonderful dining experience and in the process.  With the weather being nicer, it’s a chance to dine alfresco and experience patio dining.  We’d love to read recommendations for outdoor dining at its best or its worst.   Three chances to win and if you’re top dog, you win a cool $100.  That’s a nice bit of change that can go towards some fun shopping.  Just put fingers to keyboard and tell us all about your dining experiences, from meal to ambiance to service.  We want to know it all.

Now there’s even more chances to win with both 1st, 2nd and 3rd prizes that are available.   The criteria for winning entries will be on how helpful other Menuism’ers find your reviews to be.  So what makes a review helpful?  Check out a past Menuism article called 5 Tips Towards Writing a Great Review for some ideas or you can even  emulate some of our Featured Reviewers, who have done a fantastic job sharing their dining stories with all of us. (more…)

Posted by on April 1st, 2010

Do you want to know what’s happening in the food world? Check out the links below for some of this week’s latest.

Chef Stories

Chef Michel Richard Takes on Airplane FoodWashington Business Journal

James Beard Awards Nominees AnnouncedUSA Today

Review: ‘Jamie Oliver’s Food Revolution’The Washington Post

Restaurant Stories

Cheese-Only Restaurant Opens in London (just don’t expect Cheddar)The Independent

Coming to the Menu: Calorie CountsThe Wall Street Journal

Dubai Lifts Ban on Restaurants That Cook with AlcoholFox News

Food Stories

A ‘dude’ explains why salad is ‘man food’CNN

Germs Beat 5-second RuleChicago Tribune

The Top 10 Food MagazinesIndy Posted

Wine and Spirits Stories

7 (upstate NY) Beers to Try Before You DieThe Post Standard

Do You Spit When Wine Tasting? Here’s HowSerious Eats

Giddy Times for Chinese WinesThe Wall Street Journal

Posted by on March 26th, 2010

These days, access to foods from all over the world is easier than ever, especially when it comes to exotic fruits. This series will introduce you to some of the world’s most interesting exotic fruits and for this post, it’s all about the rambutan.  Commonly known as rambutan, it is known botanically as Nephelium lappaceum. The rambutan is a tropical tree which belongs to the Sapindaceae family and also the name of the fruit of this tree. Although it does not grow very tall, it produces an ample harvest. Rambutan is widely distributed throughout Indonesia, Malaysia and Southeast Asia and is identified in some countries, by different names.

For example, in Nicargua, Costa Rica and Panama, rambutan is identified as mamon chino while Thailand people call it ngoh. In Malaysia, another type of rambutan is sold called wild rambutan. Although the common color of rambutan is red, the fruit of this particular type is yellowish. The hairy skin of the rambutan fruit is removed to get to the whitish or pinky edible parts. They typically taste sweet though some are sour as well as sweet. (more…)

Posted by on March 25th, 2010

Dave Jensen

Dave Jensen
Craft Beer

David R. Chan

David R. Chan
Chinese Restaurant

Nevin Barich

Nevin Barich
Fast Food

Justin Chen

Justin Chen
Menuism Co-Founder

John Li

John Li
Menuism Co-Founder

Kim Kohatsu

Kim Kohatsu
Managing Editor

Quantcast