With the goal of “feeding the body and the soul,” chef-owner Alain Cohen of Got Kosher? Café, Bakery, Catering and Provisions, shares the values of kosher practice, and redefines kosher cuisine with his own original, healthy, popular creations. His culinary inspiration draws from his own lively Tunisian origins, further refined with the French technique he gained working in his family’s landmark restaurant in Paris. Alain first earned American acclaim with his signature thin-crust pretzel challahs.

Photo by Henry Alva

Photo by Henry Alva

Thanksgivvukah is a once-in-an-eternity overlap of Thanksgiving and the start of Chanukah. The reason for this year’s rare alignment has to do with quirks of the Gregorian and the Jewish calendar, one following the sun and one following the moon.

The two holidays would have overlapped in 1861, but Thanksgiving was not formally established by President Abraham Lincoln until 1863. Given the Jewish calendar, Chanukah will again fall on Thursday, November 27, in the year 79,811. (more…)

Posted by on November 27th, 2013

Photo by gomattolson

Photo by gomattolson

Kosher food can be so complex that sometimes it’s easier to peel away the layers of what Kosher is not to arrive at its true essence.

Kosher is not “Kosher-style food”

Kosher does not refer to a style of cooking. This label on a dish usually refers to the category of traditional Jewish fare which have come to be associated with Jewish traditions, such as blintzes and matzah ball soup, and there is no thing as “kosher style” that has the true meaning of the rules of what can be eaten. When a restaurant calls itself “kosher-style,” it usually means that the restaurant serves dishes that are considered traditional Eastern Jewish foods, and it almost invariably means that the food is not actually kosher. (more…)

Posted by on October 22nd, 2013

P1080036

Put into the simplest terms, the word kosher derives from Kashrut, the body of Jewish law dealing with what foods we can and cannot eat and how those foods must be prepared and eaten. Literally, it means “fit, proper or correct.” Kosher can also be used, and often is used, to describe ritual objects that are made in accordance with Jewish law and are fit for ritual use.

The main injunction comes from the Old Testament, when God asked us to be holy. In essence, you have to model this spiritual holiness at each level of your everyday life, of which eating is a huge part. (more…)

Posted by on September 12th, 2013

Bun Boy Eats LA

Bun Boy Eats LA
LA City Guide

Sara Grunden Kuhs

Sara Grunden Kuhs
Richmond, VA City Guide

Jeff Pearl

Jeff Pearl
Chicago City Guide

Juliet White

Juliet White
Sante Fe City Guide

Ashley Dickey

Ashley Dickey
Orlando City Guide

Justin Chen

Justin Chen
Menuism Co-Founder

John Li

John Li
Menuism Co-Founder

Kim Kohatsu

Kim Kohatsu
Managing Editor

Quantcast