Dave Jensen is based out of San Francisco and is the primary writer and photographer for Beer 47, a blog focused on craft beer, beer events, brewery tours, cooking with beer, and home brewing. By day, Dave continues his work in the beer world as a software developer and founder of BrewOps.

The growth of craft beer over the past decade or more is partly due to the popularity of IPA. The demand for fruity and citrus-forward IPAs has led to experimentation and innovation, including the addition of fruit to IPAs. It seems logical: if the hops in IPA smell like oranges, pineapple, or grapefruit, why not try using the real thing? When Ballast Point Brewing first released its Grapefruit Sculpin IPA, craft beer drinkers loved it. Today, dozens, if not hundreds of breweries make a fruit-based IPA, and the results are delicious.

Here’s a list of nine IPAs, each made with a different fruit, that are well worth trying. (more…)

Posted by on April 3rd, 2017

Photo by Dave Jensen

Photo by Dave Jensen

One great thing about winter seasonal beers is that they can differ quite drastically. Holiday beers are not just dark and roasty, but they also include IPA, sour beers, Belgian styles, barleywines, stouts, and spiced ales. There is truly something for everyone when it comes to holiday beers. Any craft beer lover should be able to find something on this list that they can enjoy this Winter. (more…)

Posted by on December 20th, 2016

Photo by Dave Jensen

Photo by Dave Jensen

Over the past year or two, you may have noticed a style of beer called gose starting to appear with more regularity at your favorite beer bars, bottle shops, and breweries. Gose is pronounced gohz-uh, and is an old German style of beer experiencing a resurgence in the modern craft beer market.

What exactly is a gose beer?

First, to clear up any confusion over the name, gose is not gueuze, which is a Belgian-style sour made from aged and fresh lambic. Instead, gose is a German-style sour beer that is tart, fruity, and quite refreshing. The primary ingredients in gose beers are wheat, barley, coriander, and salt. Gose is fermented with top fermenting ale yeast as well as lactobacillus, which makes the beer sour. More than half of the gose beers on the market also have fruit, which works perfectly with the sour and salt flavors. The refreshing and tart qualities of a gose is one reason why this beer is so popular, especially as a summer seasonal. (more…)

Posted by on August 15th, 2016

Photo by David Jensen

As the weather gets cold, the shelves start to fill with this season’s winter beer selections. But what exactly is winter beer? Since there is no official winter style of beer, I sought out some opinions from the craft beer industry.

“A Winter Beer should be strong to warm the soul from the cold outside and be spiced to help celebrate the season.” – Brenden Dobel, Head Brewer, Thirsty Bear Brewing

“A beer that gives you that little extra push during the cold winter months. It should warm you up and keep life a little spicier than usual with a strong malt backbone and high octane influence.” – Mark Goodwin, Brewer, McMenamins Old Church & Pub

“A good winter warmer should smell like winter. Like snow, spice, and booze. There’s something so seasonally evocative about a winter warmer. It’s the Instant Beer Drink of Winter. It’s the beverage of slow down, savor, and (perhaps ironically) chill.” – Sean Lilly Wilson, Founder and Chief Executive Optimist, Fullsteam Brewery

(more…)

Posted by on December 4th, 2012

Photo by David Jensen

Thank Oskar Blues of Lyons, Colorado, for serving Dale’s Pale Ale in a can back in 2002. Ten years later, there are dozens of craft breweries making their beer available in cans.

But why cans? Doesn’t it ruin the taste of the beer? Actually, just the opposite is true. Modern cans, unlike cans from more than 20 years ago, have a water-based polymer lining that prevent the beer from touching any metal while in the can. Canned beer has a better seal than bottles, locking out oxygen that can damage the beer. No light can get inside, which means a canned beer will never be light struck, or skunked. Environmentally, cans are more easily and more often recycled than glass, and because cans are lighter, they take less energy to ship. Finally, cans are much more portable and can go many places where glass cannot. (more…)

Posted by on August 2nd, 2012

Photos by David Jensen

Have you ever walked into a beer bar or pub and noticed some of the taps both looked and dispensed beer differently? Or have you ever been to a beer festival, or beer event, where beer was served directly from a spigot in the side of a metal container propped up on a table? If so, then you may have already encountered cask conditioned beer. If not, then after you read this article, I hope you seek some out. (more…)

Posted by on May 1st, 2012

Photo by David Jensen

Spring is nearly here and it is a time for renewal, growth, cleaning, and warmer weather. It’s the perfect opportunity to renew your ideas about beer and to clean out old misconceptions by exploring craft beer in new, different, and creative ways. If you want to make this Spring the season to seek out new craft beer experiences, I have outlined ten different ways below. (more…)

Posted by on March 8th, 2012

Belgian Beer Styles

Photo by David Jensen

“In Belgium, there are no styles,” proclaims Peter Bouckaert, Brewmaster of New Belgium Brewing. This statement exemplifies the individuality, non-conformity and creativity of Belgian brewers. Notwithstanding their individualism, Belgian brewers have strong ties to their history and tradition of brewing. What does all this mean to the Belgian beer drinker? It’s simple: you can have two beers that are technically the same style, and feature some similar attributes, but taste quite different. In this way, Belgian brewers have had a strong influence on brewers around the world, especially on the craft beer movement in America.

Despite the non-conformity of Belgian brewers and American brewers of Belgian-style beers, this style of beer does feature common attributes across different types. These categorizations are important because they create a language that brewers use to communicate with consumers what they’re about to drink. This guide introduces some of the most popular types of Belgian-style beers, and what you can expect from each type. (more…)

Posted by on December 8th, 2011

Stout beer

Photo by David Jensen

As winter draws near and the weather gets cold, many beer drinkers are drawn to the appeal of something richer, darker, stronger and more complex. For many, stout fits the bill perfectly. For others, stout is a year-long staple. Regardless of the time of year, there is no doubt that this centuries-old style has a broad appeal for its rich texture, roasty aroma, and malty—sometimes sweet—flavor. In fact, in April 2011, the Brewers Association reported that stout was the fastest-growing style of beer, outpacing both pilsner and IPA.

One of the most common stouts on the market today is Guinness. If you’ve had this beer, then you’re familiar with the creamy mouthfeel and full-bodied texture. Although it seems heavy, Guinness is a relatively light beer weighing in at roughly 4 percent alcohol by volume. The creamy, heavy feeling comes from being gassed with nitrogen instead of carbon dioxide. Furthermore, Guinness is merely a single example of one style of stout. The world of stout is far broader and more delicious than any single example. Today there’s a wide variety of stouts, including oatmeal stout, milk stout, dry stout, imperial stout, bourbon barrel-aged stout, cherry stout, chocolate stout, coffee stout and oyster stout. (more…)

Posted by on November 3rd, 2011

Photo by David Jensen

To truly understand and appreciate craft beer, and to communicate about it with friends and enthusiasts, it helps to know the terminology used in the beer world. Expanding your craft beer vocabulary can help you better understand the differences between different styles and appreciate your beer more. For beer newbies and longtime enthusiasts, this beer glossary covers all the beer jargon, beer terms, and beer descriptors you need to know to enjoy drinking craft beer. (more…)

Posted by on September 14th, 2011

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