Kim Thompson is the program manager for the Seafood for the Future (SFF) program at the Aquarium of the Pacific in Long Beach, California. SFF is a nonprofit seafood advisory program dedicated to promoting healthy and responsible seafood choices in Southern California. The program works with restaurants, fishermen, seafood purveyors, government agencies and other nonprofit groups to execute its mission. Visit SeafoodForTheFuture.org to learn more about SFF partners and recommendations.

Photo by powerplantop

Photo by powerplantop

Recent price hikes in shrimp are largely due to the Early Mortality Syndrome disease in Thailand and Mexico. The sweet and firm crustaceans are the number one seafood import into the U.S., and they account for nearly a quarter of the nation’s seafood consumption. But these numbers do not bode well for the sustainable seafood movement because shrimp is a tough item to source responsibly in the quantities it is currently consumed. (more…)

Posted by on October 1st, 2013

Co-written with Betsy Suttle

Whiting and Flounder from the Cape Ann Community Supported Fishery. Photo by mogagraham3.

Whiting and Flounder from the Cape Ann Community Supported Fishery. Photo by mogagraham3.

We often don’t know where the food on our plate comes from. When it comes to seafood, this might be particularly true. While U.S. seafood is among the best managed in the world, we import 91 percent of what is consumed in this country. Much of this imported seafood comes from countries with minimal or no effective management in place to ensure healthy stocks, ecosystems, and communities. Aside from the country of origin, U.S. consumers often have no way of knowing how imported fish was caught or produced, or if future fish stocks, ecosystems, and communities are being protected. (more…)

Posted by on May 21st, 2013

Bluefin tuna. Photo by InvernoDreaming.

Bluefin tuna. Photo by InvernoDreaming.

Co-written with Betsy Suttle

With the recent $1.76 million sale of a single bluefin tuna in Tokyo, bluefin tuna – the poster child for sustainable seafood – is front page news again. These apex predators fetch such high prices because their populations are too low to support the demand, primarily fueled by the sushi market.

What’s Going On With Bluefin Tuna?

There are several species of bluefin tuna, and all of the world’s populations have declined dramatically in recent decades. Bluefin tuna are warm-blooded top predators that live for more than 20 years and are slow to mature. Due to their value, bluefin are taken at rates faster than they can repopulate. Many bluefin landed in today’s fleets are younger and smaller animals that haven’t had a chance to reproduce, further reducing their ability to bounce back from the immense fishing pressure. (more…)

Posted by on February 21st, 2013

Photo by Streetname

With fall officially upon us and the cool weather creeping in, the chowders, cioppinos, and fisherman’s stews grow ever more appealing. The stars of these savory concoctions that warm the soul are usually shellfish known as bivalves — particularly mussels and clams.

What is a bivalve? Bivalves are shellfish consisting of two hinged shells and a soft body, such as oysters, mussels, clams, and scallops. These shellfish provide a slightly sweet taste and chewy texture that perfectly compliments the crunch of farm-fresh vegetables and savory broths from which we make our favorite seafood soups and stews. Bivalves are an excellent source of low-fat protein, vitamin B12, and potassium. They can also be a responsible seafood choice! (more…)

Posted by on November 29th, 2012

Photo by kozy and dan kitchens

When most of us think of lobster, the image of the bright red crustacean with giant claws strewn out in front, glistening on a plate with a side of melted butter comes to mind. Over the course of the summer, coastal communities all over Southern California celebrate these clawed American or “Maine” lobsters from New England in a series of Lobster Fests. Meanwhile, the clawless, native California spiny lobster is nowhere to be found. (more…)

Posted by on October 18th, 2012

Photo by Valentina Wein

For those in the know regarding sustainable seafood, Chilean sea bass (Patagonian toothfish) has become a poster child for red-listed species. Rampant poaching and severe overfishing means Chilean sea bass is often illegally and irresponsibly caught. Known for its flavorful, velvety texture that melts in your mouth, chefs and consumers alike are in love with this fish — making it difficult for some to remove the species from their menus. There are specific stocks that have been certified by the Marine Stewardship Council (MSC), but this only adds a higher premium to an already pricy fish (both economically and environmentally). Good news — there is a healthy and sustainable substitute caught off the Pacific and Alaskan coasts year-round! (more…)

Posted by on August 16th, 2012

Bristol Bay Smoked Salmon. Photo by Benny’s Chop House

Summer is the season for fresh, heart-healthy wild Alaskan salmon. In July, the world’s largest annual sockeye salmon run takes place in Bristol Bay, Alaska. Known as the “salmon lover’s salmon” and celebrated for its brilliant red color and distinct, robust flavor, sockeye from Bristol Bay is naturally rich in heart-healthy Omega 3s. (more…)

Posted by on July 17th, 2012

We’re delighted to welcome Kim Thompson as a regular contributor and Menuism sustainable seafood expert! Get to know Kim a little bit better below, see the guest post she wrote last month for National Seafood Month, and watch out for her future articles in this space. Her first contribution on Bristol Bay salmon will post tomorrow morning. Please help us welcome Kim in the comments! – KK (more…)

Posted by on July 16th, 2012

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