Italian food celebrates fresh ingredients and vibrant flavors. Learn more about Italian food traditions and the history of your favorite Italian dishes below.

italian-desserts
It is a nearly impossible to choose just ten desserts that represent Italy. Italian desserts are many, varied, seasonal, and fiercely regional, so it is difficult to proclaim a definitive list. The north to south differences in climate have much to do with dessert preference, and though there are several that most everyone will recognize, there are a multitude of specialities that seldom make it out of their regions, let alone across the pond to Italian restaurants. So if you come across them, do not hesitate; run to try them. (more…)

Posted by on April 13th, 2015

Rooftop Pizzeria's No. 5 Pizza (BLT) All photos by Juliet White

Rooftop Pizzeria’s No. 5 Pizza
All photos by Juliet White

Pizzas have come a long way since 1905, when the first American pizzeria opened in New York. While pies originally consisted of just dough and tomato sauce, nowadays they are festooned with toppings, from the classic to the gourmet. Here are some of the best pies that Santa Fe has to offer. (more…)

Posted by on October 13th, 2014

Various liqueurs and digestifs. All photos by Marla Gulley Roncaglia

Various liqueurs and digestifs. All photos by Marla Gulley Roncaglia

The Italian way of eating is about the enjoyment of quality genuine food and drink. It is also about eating and drinking in a progression that will aid in proper digestion to enhance the overall experience.

When it comes to Italian drinks, the most obvious thought is usually coffee or wine for which Italy is so famous. You would, however, miss out on a vast range of afternoon and evening drinks shared with friends or consumed to stimulate the appetite or add the perfect finish to a meal. Most of these drinks have an alcohol content that ranges between 15% to 55%. In America, these type of drinks are loosely referred to by the French words aperitif (aperitivo in Italian), digestif (digestivo), and liqueurs. These categories are broad and difficult to categorize, as lines blur with many drinks considered to stimulate the appetite, aid digestion, or simply be pleasurable to drink. Here is a brief look at some of these popular Italian drinks. (more…)

Posted by on February 10th, 2014

Photo by Rizka Budiati

Photo by Rizka Budiati

When your stomach aches, your mom may have offered you saltines or plain toast — something light that wouldn’t aggravate your tummy. In Italy, this same principle applies, but with pasta.

In 1914, one particular upset stomach originated what we now know as fettuccine alfredo. Alfredo di Lelio ran a restaurant on the Via della Scrofa in Rome. His wife Ines was pregnant with their second child, and the pregnancy caused her terrible nausea. Unable to keep much down, Alfredo made Ines a dish of plain pasta, pasta in bianco, or white pasta. He tossed the fresh-made pasta with butter and Parmesan. (more…)

Posted by on October 30th, 2013

Assorted Salumi. All photos by Marla Gulley Roncaglia

Assorted Salumi. All photos by Marla Gulley Roncaglia

Necessity is the mother of invention, and so the tradition of salting, smoking and air drying was borne from the necessity of conserving meat for long periods of time after the slaughter of animals raised for food. Cured meats, or salumi in Italian, is the general name for this type of meat preservation and has been a staple of the Italian diet for well over two thousand years. Most people are familiar with the spicy salami of southern Italy that Americans know as pepperoni, and the prosciutto crudo of Parma, fondly called Parma ham in the States, but those are merely an introduction. There are countless variations developed and perfected through the ages; the vast amount beyond these two most familiar cured meat specialties are well worth searching out and exploring what the salumeria, or Italian delicatessen, has on offer. (more…)

Posted by on June 13th, 2013

Easter Eggs and Colombo Easter Cake for sale at Pinerolo market. Photos by Marla Gulley

Easter Eggs and Colombo Easter Cake for sale at Pinerolo market. Photos by Marla Gulley

Spring arrives with that impatient wait in the air — everyone is happy that the days are longer and the temperatures are starting to warm up, but could it please hurry up just a little? The Easter holiday, although based in Christianity, certainly embraces the welcoming of springtime that is eagerly anticipated after the dark, cold, and long winter nights.

Here in northern Italy, we are still experiencing snow, slush, and chilly nights. Italians describe this month as “Marzo, Pazzo,” or crazy March. But with the onset of spring, it’s a time to change up the menu, transitioning from the hearty stews with winter cabbages and potatoes to lighter fare such as dandelion and other early greens for a spring salad or frittata, an Italian omelet.

Whether in America or Europe (and Italy in particular), I think of eggs every which way during the Easter period. The dyeing of eggs is not a common tradition in Italy but has recently started to catch on. Italian traditional Easter dishes, however, prominently feature eggs. Easter menus also often feature lamb and goat as the seasonal meat, after the animals have begun to birth their young in the late winter and very early spring. It is a natural way for the farmer or shepherd to cull too many male offspring from the herd while also serving the dish of gratefulness. All regions of Italy have special dishes for Easter, and many of these dishes have migrated to the whole of Italy, sometimes becoming so popular they might now be served all year round. Here is a sampling of the representative dishes and various courses of the Italian Easter menu. It is by no means an exhaustive list. You might consider some for your own Easter dinner or look for them at your favorite Italian restaurant this spring. (more…)

Posted by on March 27th, 2013

Savory antipasti nibbles. Photos by Marla Gulley

Savory antipasti nibbles. Photos by Marla Gulley

When dining in or out, Italians generally think about the quality and how flavorsome their food is, followed by the order and timing to ensure digestion and maximize enjoyment. Meals are a multi-course affair that tends to expand and contract as needed. You can be assured that there will be at least three courses, maybe two, but never just one plate. Pizza, however, is the exception because you will be enjoying an entire pizza of your own, so an additional salad or small starter would be about all most people could fit in. Naturally, there are many variations on the Italian dining experience, but the traditional menu throughout all of Italy consists of antipasti, primi piatti, secondi piatti with or without contorno, dolce, and beverages. (more…)

Posted by on January 29th, 2013

Assorted Scamorza cheeses. All photos by Marla Gulley Roncaglia

In 1986, the fast food chain McDonald’s opened a franchise in close proximity to Rome’s historic Spanish Steps. Carlo Petrini of Bra, Italy and a group of like-minded Italians from the Piedmont region feared that this powerful restaurant chain and other giant international food businesses would threaten Italy’s traditional food and cultural heritage by a steady erosion of quality and integrity. I have said this before and I will say it again: if there is one single thing that unites all Italians, it is their passion for their food and the culture surrounding it. The Slow Food movement was borne out of a desire to push back against the loss of cultural food identity, food diversity, its sources, and the disappearance of the myriad smaller businesses surrounding the food industry that are unable to compete with large companies. (more…)

Posted by on November 27th, 2012

This is the third installment of a three-part series exploring the variances in Italian regional cuisine. Visit the Northern Italian regions here and Central Italy here.

Spicy Calabrese pasta. All photos by Marla Gulley Roncaglia

In this third and final part of the regional cuisine of Italy, we find ourselves firmly in the land of olive oil and spicy peppers. Southern Italy is where, with few exceptions, pasta is served as part of each meal. Generally, the cuisine leaves behind the richer butter and cream dishes and features spicier tomato-based pasta.

In arbitrarily dividing Italy into three sections of north, central, and south, some of the regions naturally commingle from one section to the next, with their feet sometimes firmly planted in both. The qualities that unite and separate one region from another are profound because Italy is a country united, barely 150 years ago, from autonomous countries with unique customs and food traditions. Through the years, regional dishes migrated up and down the peninsula and across the sea, sharing a respect for genuine ingredients and an Italian passion for their native regions’ specialties first; embracing the others when it suits their taste. (more…)

Posted by on October 4th, 2012

Photo by Lara Ferroni

Farro seems to be taking over menus at every stage of the meal — soups, salads, mains, and even desserts. But what exactly is farro?

Often used as a substitute for pasta or rice, farro is a grain with a nutty flavor similar to brown rice. It is rich in fiber, magnesium and vitamins A, B, C, and E.

Farro may seem trendy, but it’s actually ancient. It was first domesticated 10,000 years ago in the Fertile Crescent, has been found in Egyptian tombs, and is believed to have sustained the Roman legions. Today, farro grows in the central and northern Italian regions including Lazio, Umbria, and Tuscany. Historically, these were impoverished areas, and the longevity of its people is sometimes attributed to farro. (more…)

Posted by on September 17th, 2012

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