Menuism Dining Blog
Dining education for foodies

Fried Jidori Chicken. Photo by naftels

I first encountered Jidori chicken last year at the Skyline restaurant atop the Huntley Hotel in Los Angeles. Having never heard the term, I asked the hotel’s events director seated at my table. “It’s like Kobe beef,” she explained, “but for chicken.”

Unlike Kobe, however, Jidori does not correspond to a specific region of Japan. Instead, the term roughly translates to “from the ground.” Jidori chicken refers to a type of mixed-breed domestic free-range chicken known for its robust flavor. The original Jidori chicken began when a precious pure breed of chicken called Hinaidori was crossed with the Rhode Island Red to create Akita Hinai-jidori, with Akita referring to the prefecture of Japan, and Hinai referring to the town. The chickens are fed an all-vegetarian diet, including clover, tomatoes, and apples. They are delivered the same day of slaughter, ensuring freshness — so much so that Hinai-jidori chickens are served sashimi-style. Yup, raw.

In the early 1990s, Dennis Mao, a Chinese-American whose family business was food distribution, believed there was an American market for Jidori-style, organic, free-range birds. He started Mao Foods to deliver a high-quality, cage-free bird without hormones, steroids, or meat byproducts within 24 hours of slaughter. Unlike Kobe, known for its marbled fat, freshness is the real difference between jidori-style and factory-raised chickens. Jidori chickens are never frozen, and retain less water than most chickens, resulting in a pinker breast, firmer texture, and fuller chicken flavor.

Wolfgang Puck was an early adopter of Mao’s Jidori chickens, and they grew cachet on the L.A. restaurant scene. So much so that in 2010, Mao told the New York Times that some chefs who don’t have his chickens claim it on the menu. He has since trademarked the term.

Mao admits that chickens raised sustainably by small organic farms and bought locally from the farmer will taste just as good as his own. But as Mao Foods overnights more chickens from Los Angeles to cities like Seattle and Chicago, expect to see Jidori chicken (and its imitators) on more menus nationwide.

Want to see what all the fuss is about? Try Jidori chicken at some of these restaurants:

Robata-Ya – Los Angeles, CA

This restaurant is owned by the Mao family, and alongside chicken skewers, Robata-Ya serves raw chicken-liver sashimi. “That is a hard-core Japanese dish that pretty much only Japanese customers will get,” Mao said.

Seastar Restaurant and Raw Bar – Seattle and Bellevue, WA

Chef John Howie prepares his Jidori with herb-stuffed chèvre, garlic, fingerling potatoes, sun-dried tomatoes, and spinach.

Tru – Chicago, IL

So earthy it’s served on a log, Tru serves its chicken in a light rosemary demi-glaze with hon shimeji mushrooms.

Have you spotted Jidori chicken in your town? Let us know in the comments!

Posted by on September 24th, 2012

Kim Kohatsu judges the quality of her relationships on the ability to share food. If she can't split an appetizer with you, in her eyes, you are pretty much worthless. Kim's current food adventures revolve around ramen, sushi, Indian curries, Sichuan food, and fried chicken. Oh, and cheeseburgers. Kim loves a good cheeseburger.

Rachael White

Rachael White
Hosting and Entertaining

Kanako Noda

Kanako Noda
Japanese Cuisine

Elena Rosemond-Hoerr

Elena Rosemond-Hoerr
Southern Cuisine

Dale Yasunaga

Dale Yasunaga
Hawaiian Cuisine

Dave Jensen

Dave Jensen
Craft Beer

Duggan McDonnell

Duggan McDonnell
Cocktails

Prerna Singh

Prerna Singh
Indian Cuisine

John Brady

John Brady
Grass-Fed Beef

Mr. Lew

Mr. Lew
Burger

Kim Thompson

Kim Thompson
Sustainable Seafood

Michelle Kretzer

Michelle Kretzer
Vegan Foods

David R. Chan

David R. Chan
Chinese Restaurant

Lauren Deitsch

Lauren Deitsch
Chocolate

Alain Cohen

Alain Cohen
Kosher Foods

Jackie Yoo

Jackie Yoo
Korean Foods

Nevin Barich

Nevin Barich
Fast Food

Dawn Gribble

Dawn Gribble
British Food

Justina Huddleston

Justina Huddleston
Food Trends

Bun Boy Eats LA

Bun Boy Eats LA
LA City Guide

Sara Grunden Kuhs

Sara Grunden Kuhs
Richmond, VA City Guide

Jeff Pearl

Jeff Pearl
Chicago City Guide

Juliet White

Juliet White
Sante Fe City Guide

Ashley Dickey

Ashley Dickey
Orlando City Guide

Justin Chen

Justin Chen
Menuism Co-Founder

John Li

John Li
Menuism Co-Founder

Kim Kohatsu

Kim Kohatsu
Managing Editor

Quantcast