As a whole, Los Angeles’s Chinese food scene surpassed New York’s over 20 years ago and continues to pull away. However, you’ll find some things Chinese food-wise in New York that simply don’t exist in Los Angeles, including these four restaurants.

The Chinese fine dining establishment: La Chine

Situated in the Chinese-owned Waldorf-Astoria, La Chine is the type of high-end authentic Chinese restaurant on offer in New York, along with Fung Tu, Cafe China, and Hakkasan. After the demise of Hakkasan Beverly Hills (and perhaps Chi Lin), there are no longer such posh Chinese dining options in LA. Perhaps Los Angeles is just not as much of an expense account town. Sure, it does boast the entertainment industry, but still pales in comparison to New York, with Wall Street, the investment banks, and all the corporate headquarters. (more…)

Posted by on March 20th, 2017

Photo by Garrett Ziegler / Flickr

Five years ago I opened up a hornet’s nest when I wrote my Top 10 listing of Chinese restaurants in the United States. The list included 10 California restaurants and none from New York, because even though New York once had the best Chinese food in the US, it now lagged badly behind Los Angeles and San Francisco. Despite howls of protests from outraged New Yorkers, the ranking of New York Chinese food is no longer arguable. Even New York Times columnist Mark Bittman stated rather matter of factly that, “for Chinese food, there’s no place in the United States like Southern California,” and in particular, the San Gabriel Valley.

More recently, I made a comment which on the surface might be viewed as an even greater insult to New York Chinese food. I said, “pound for pound, authentic Chinese food in Phoenix is better than that in New York.” I did not intend it to be a derogatory comment about New York Chinese food, and I didn’t mean to say that there wasn’t a lot of good Chinese food in New York. Rather, it was a reflection of the current state of Chinese food, where excellent Chinese food can be found in a lot more places than just a few years ago. (more…)

Posted by on February 13th, 2017

Planning a trip to Oregon? Wondering where to eat? Looking for a restaurant in your area that features Oregon wine? You’re in luck!

One of the most highly anticipated lists of the year was released in January by the Oregon Wine Board. The 2017 Oregon Wine A-List Awards recognizes restaurants across the world that enthusiastically support Oregon wine and show an appreciation for the diverse regions and varietals of Oregon. This year’s list includes over 90 restaurants in Oregon and the rest of America. It is wonderful to see so much support for Oregon wine around the country!

Here’s a secret: When I’m looking for Oregon wine to feature at my Cellar 503 wine club, I pop into these restaurants to uncover what hot new finds the local chefs and sommeliers have discovered. Check out a few of my faves: (more…)

Posted by on February 6th, 2017

Photo by charlene mcbride / Flickr

Photo by charlene mcbride / Flickr

In this ongoing series covering American cities with a historic center city Chinatown, there have been two distinct models. In most cities, the best and most authentic Chinese food migrated out of the historic Chinatown into either suburban Chinese communities or to secondary areas away from the downtown core. However, exceptions such as Philadelphia and Chicago illustrate the second model, where the historic Chinatown still reigns supreme, with a few secondary locales to find authentic Chinese food.

In the case of present-day Boston, however, neither model seems to fit. Ten or fifteen years ago, Boston’s historic Chinatown was still dominant, and indeed at that time, I commented that Chicago and Boston were the main exceptions to the suburbanization of Chinese food in America. Today, Boston Chinatown still dominates as a cultural and commercial center (though its borders are threatened by development and gentrification). While Chinatown has not been entirely eclipsed for dining, there is now significantly good Chinese food to be found outside its boundaries. (more…)

Posted by on January 17th, 2017

Photo by star5112 / Flickr

Photo by star5112 / Flickr

For any city with a historic 19th century Chinatown, the original locus of Chinese dining was obviously Chinatown. However, as my series has chronicled, the best Chinese dining in most of these cities has shifted to various suburban communities. In the case of Los Angeles, the shift has been especially complex. Like an army marching onward to the next hill, there has been a continuous eastward migration of Chinese residents, followed by a like movement of Chinese restaurants. The key to this push eastward is a strong preference of Los Angeles-area Chinese Americans for new housing developments, as capsulized by longtime resident Gordon Chow, who said, “You have to go east to find newer and cheaper homes.”

(more…)

Posted by on December 12th, 2016

Photo by Kevin O'Mara / Flickr

Photo by Kevin O’Mara / Flickr

There’s nothing like treating yourself to a nice drink when you’re out on the town, whether you’re at a new restaurant or revisiting an old favorite. But too often we’re stuck choosing between beer and wine, never considering that a cocktail can also be paired with food, and not just enjoyed as a before- or after-dinner indulgence.

Luckily, using the same knowledge you have of wine and beer pairings, it’s easy to find a cocktail that can match your meal. With a little caution and a bit of risk, you may find a new favorite way to enjoy a drink with dinner. (more…)

Posted by on September 12th, 2016

Photo by Dave Jensen

Photo by Dave Jensen

Over the past year or two, you may have noticed a style of beer called gose starting to appear with more regularity at your favorite beer bars, bottle shops, and breweries. Gose is pronounced gohz-uh, and is an old German style of beer experiencing a resurgence in the modern craft beer market.

What exactly is a gose beer?

First, to clear up any confusion over the name, gose is not gueuze, which is a Belgian-style sour made from aged and fresh lambic. Instead, gose is a German-style sour beer that is tart, fruity, and quite refreshing. The primary ingredients in gose beers are wheat, barley, coriander, and salt. Gose is fermented with top fermenting ale yeast as well as lactobacillus, which makes the beer sour. More than half of the gose beers on the market also have fruit, which works perfectly with the sour and salt flavors. The refreshing and tart qualities of a gose is one reason why this beer is so popular, especially as a summer seasonal. (more…)

Posted by on August 15th, 2016

Why choose one restaurant for dinner when you could choose dozens? There’s a food hall and farmer’s market renaissance happening around the country, and if you visit any of these locations, you’ll want to make sure you start with an empty stomach.

(more…)

Posted by on July 11th, 2016

Photo by Didriks / Flickr

Photo by Didriks / Flickr

With 4,269 breweries in the United States alone, craft beer represents a 12% share of the total beer market. As recently as 2011, craft beer only accounted for 5.7% of the market. Doubling market share in just four years demonstrates how quickly the craft beer industry has expanded and matured, and with it, so have the expectations of the beer-drinking consumer.

The American Shaker Pint

The American Shaker Pint

Patrons expect proper beer service, which includes proper beer glassware. The importance of the beer glass goes beyond aesthetics. Depending on the type of beer, the proper glass can also enhance aroma or taste. (more…)

Posted by on June 13th, 2016

Photo by Christophe Porteneuve / Flickr

Photo by Christophe Porteneuve / Flickr

You may love checking out the latest restaurant to open in your neighborhood, but these historic inns, restaurants, and taverns beat the new kids in town any day.

(more…)

Posted by on May 31st, 2016

Dave Jensen

Dave Jensen
Craft Beer

David R. Chan

David R. Chan
Chinese Restaurant

Nevin Barich

Nevin Barich
Fast Food

Justin Chen

Justin Chen
Menuism Co-Founder

John Li

John Li
Menuism Co-Founder

Kim Kohatsu

Kim Kohatsu
Managing Editor

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