March is one of those months that I hate to love. The weather is a tease, giving you beautiful spring days right next to bitterly cold ones (or, sometimes, excruciatingly hot ones). Not much is in season, but you can feel the expectation building in the air. And of course, I can’t help but to love March for Pi(e) Day.

Anyone who took math as a teen will remember (at least vaguely) that pi is a mathematical constant that is the ratio of any Euclidean circle’s circumference to its diameter. Pi is approximately equal to 3.14. Or, at least this is what Wikipedia tells me. For me, math class was more of a place to eat Bojangles and think about the boys I was crushing on. What I do remember about pi (besides that one kid who was always so cool because he could recite however many numbers) is that on March 14th each year, my math teacher would bring in pie. Because, you know, pi/pie. AWESOME. Pi Day is PIE DAY. (more…)

Posted by on March 14th, 2012

When it comes to pie, it’s considered an American dessert icon and in fact, a well-known quote can end with “…as American as Apple Pie.”  However, there’s more to the humble pie than you may think, so I present to you 10 Things to Know About Pie.

The  Romans Have It: The first pie recipe was published by the Romans and was for a rye-crusted goat cheese and honey pie.

Let It All Hang Out “Coffyn-Style”: The crust of the pies in England use to be referred to as ‘coffyn’. There was actually more crust than filling. Often these pies were made using fowl and the legs were left to hang over the side of the dish and used as handles.

Mince Me Out: In 1644, Oliver Cromwell banned the eating of mince pie on Christmas, declaring it a pagan form of pleasure. The ban remained in effect for 16 years.

Can I Have Eggs with my Pie?: Pie as a dessert is a relatively recent development – in the 19th century fruit pies were more commonly a breakfast food.

No Glory for Ice Cream: At one time it was against the law to serve ice cream on cherry pie in Kansas.

The Great Pretender: Libby’s canned pumpkin was introduced to America in 1929. Libby’s is not actually pumpkin but another kind of squash called a Dickinson that also has orange flesh.

Rumor Has It: It is rumored that the Apple Marketing Board of New York used slogans such as “An apple a day keeps the doctor away” and “as American as apple pie”, and thus “was able to successfully ‘rehabilitate’ the apple as a popular comestible” in the early 20th century when prohibition outlawed cider production.

A Pie By Any Other Name: Boston Cream Pie is actually a cake; cheesecake is actually a pie (a tart, technically).

That’s a Lot of Pie: If you lined up the number of pies sold at U.S. grocery stores during Thanksgiving, they would span more than half the globe.

Apple Pie is Top Dog: One out of four Americans prefer apple pie, followed by pumpkin or sweet potato (17%), anything chocolate (14%), lemon meringue (11%) and cherry (10%)

Posted by on November 8th, 2009

Dave Jensen

Dave Jensen
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